Lessons from the East: Part III

This is the third and final of my posts about my trip to Taiwan in May 2015 and how it helped my law practice.  

Lesson 3: Memories and relationships, if left uncultivated and unattended, may fade.

Perhaps like after any really good vacation, I came back from my trip with clear and vivid memories of some of my favorite things: a breathtaking gorge of epic proportions formed in marble,

taroko-gorge-3

Photo: Michael Acierno

 

a parking garage transformed into a beautiful (and aromatic) flower market every weekend,

 

and the site of people who happily gathered many mornings for tai chi.

 

How, after just two months, have I lost so much of the clarity and intensity of those memories?  It is a little disheartening.  How can I better hold on to those memories?  I think part of the answer is with intention and reflection.  After spending just a few minutes focusing, I not only remember the memories, but feel them again.

The cases I work on, just like good memories, deserve deliberate attention and reflection.  My best case strategies and ideas would quickly fade if I didn’t deliberately spend time cultivating and working on them.  My office would turn into unorganized piles of undeveloped and unfinished projects.  My relationships with co-workers and clients would fall apart.  In short, my world would be in disarray.

Okay, maybe that’s a little extreme and fatalistic.  But the truth is (as I think all of my grandparents told me at one time or another growing up), there is no substitute for hard work.  Fortunately, I think what I’m talking about isn’t all that hard, especially by choosing to devote time to it every day.  The pay off — rich memories, strong relationships, and meaningful work — is well worth it to me. 

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Lauren Davis

Lauren E. Davis litigates complex medical malpractice and personal injury cases. She has handled cases from inception to trial in federal and state courts throughout Virginia. To speak with Lauren about your case, contact her at (540)985-0098.